Good Night, Bruce

From Bend, Oregon

Site of the last Blockbuster

in the world.

Last of our kinds

the two of us

Blockbuster and I

Creatures from a different time, prehistoric, prehensile, prepubescent examples of premier, though bedraggled establishments

A great place to wonder the isles

at the age of 14, looking for Bruce Lee and the hardest corp

soft corp

porn

Friday night.

Good night Bend.

Good night America.

Good night Bruce Lee.

Good night porn.

Good night 14.

From Account Coe

4638 – 1987,

Good night.

Diggins and other Olympians talk to Congress

Uphill Skier dreamed this up and then worked together with POW and CCL to make it happen.  We’re so psyched!

Citizens' Climate Lobby
CCL Weekly Briefing, Apr. 25, 2018

Table of Contents:
Olympians brief Congress
New CSC members
Early bird conference pricing
Media Tip of the Month
Conservative Caucus tabling
New chapter in Zimbabwe
LTE of the week
Blog roundup
Learning opportunities
Action Team updates
Winter Olympians give a message to Congress: Winter is leaving

Five members of the U.S. Winter Olympic Team appeared on Capitol Hill Wednesday with an urgent message: Climate change is not something that will happen in the distant future. It’s happening now, and it’s affecting winter and the sports we love.

“Climate change used to seem looming and far away,” said gold medal freestyle skier David Wise. “But in my lifetime, I’ve seen winters start later and become more volatile.” He said that because of drought years and then years of heavy precipitation, he never knows when the season will start, or if it will be good.

Joining Wise at the briefing for congressional staffers were cross-country skier Jessie Diggins, halfpipe snowboarder Arielle Gold, biathlete Maddie Phaneuf and alpine skier Stacey Cook.

Gold medalist Diggins said, “We’re your canaries in the coal mine. We see [climate change] happening all over the world, and it affects everyone at every level. I see man-made snow everywhere we go — nobody can count on natural snow anymore. It’s a sign we really need to do something. Climate change is taking away a very healthy, incredibly fun, family-oriented sport that I love.”

The briefing was co-hosted by Senators Bennet (D-CO) and Collins (R-ME), and representatives from at least 50 different Hill offices were in attendance. To see video clips, pictures, and more quotes from the event, head to CCL’s Twitter or Instagram.

And check out the story about the briefing on ThinkProgress.

 

XC Climate Challenge – Video from our XC Olympians

See what Andy, Jessie, Simi and Liz have to say about climate action.

You been called out!

Click on THIS

Below is the

XC Climate Challenge

Dear Cross Country Skier,

The cross country community is a highly motivated, educated, and energetic group of people connected both literally and figuratively through our sport. Sixteen years ago we seldom reached the top 30 on the international result sheet. Today we have won World Cup and World Championship medals, won the overall World Cup and, now Olympic Gold. This progress is a result of our nationwide, community-focused effort. It is time for us to apply our cross country power to make our planet and our sport sustainable.

Climate change is a global threat that is directly affecting our sport, our way of life, and life on earth. It is time for us to add our collective voice to a climate change solution that is already underway. Through the Citizens’ Climate Lobby, a swelling of voices and non-partisan action is already leading to a solution to global climate change.

Here is a two-minute video of the problem, the solution, and the overall plan.

This is a video made by our own XC Olympians: Olympian Climate video

Now you and your ski team can put muscle behind the solution.

Join the XC Climate Challenge (#xcclimatechallenge). Here’s how:

The quick version:

You and your team members will write and sign the Constituent Comment Letter (linked here).

Mail them here:

XC Climate Challenge

633 8th ave

Salt Lake City, UT 84103

For a full explanation read here:

*First, you and your team members will write and sign the Constituent Comment Letter (link and attached).  Please make it positive and solution-oriented.  The goal of these letters is to lead our leaders by showing them that the people in their districts demand strong climate action. Letter comments can be general or, preferably, specific.  We are asking our representatives to join the bipartisan Climate Solutions Caucus, which at this time has 68 members—half Republicans, half Democrats. And also to support CCL’S carbon-fee and dividend proposal.

*Second, send your letters to me, Pete Vordenberg. The Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL) and I will count them and the CCL will hand deliver them to your congressional representatives. These letters are the key element of this project. This strategy has been proven effective!

*Third, nominate youth skiers from your team to take the lead in this effort. Representatives will be selected from all participating teams to represent the cross country community at a Citizen Climate Lobby National Conference in June. Prizes from ski-industry businesses will also be given to teams based on the number of letters they get signed, taking team size into consideration.

That is the challenge.

When: Now. This contest begins now and will end April 30th. Please do not delay! Start now and keep going.

A good team strategy to get as many letters as possible:  

  1.    Create a Climate Activism Event or add Climate Activism to an existing event for your team and community.
  2.    Show the movie “Saving Snow” and have all the constituent comment letters ready to be personalized, signed, put in a large mailing envelope, and sent to me.

How to sign up for a showing of “Saving our Snow”.  Click here.

 

Does your team already have a climate or climate activism project?  Let us know what it is and we can share it with our community!

Contact Pete Vordenberg with questions, ideas and to register your team.

 

pvatuphillskier@gmail.com

XC Climate Challenge

 

Time to get your race face on:  XC Climate Challenge

The quick version:

You and your team members will write and sign the Constituent Comment Letter (linked here).

Mail them here:

XC Climate Challenge

633 8th ave

Salt Lake City, UT 84103

For a full explanation read here:

Dear Cross Country Skier,

 

The cross country community is a highly motivated, educated, and energetic group of people connected both literally and figuratively through our sport. Sixteen years ago we seldom reached the top 30 on the international result sheet. Today we have won World Cup and World Championship medals, won the overall World Cup and now, Olympic Gold. This progress is a result of our nationwide, community-focused effort. It is time for us to apply our cross country power to make our planet and our sport sustainable.

Climate change is a global threat that is directly affecting our sport, our way of life, and life on earth. It is time for us to add our collective voice to a climate change solution that is already underway. Through the Citizens’ Climate Lobby, a swelling of voices and non-partisan action is already leading to a solution to global climate change.

Here is a two-minute video of the problem, the solution, and the overall plan.

 

This is a video made by our own XC Olympians: Olympian Climate video

Now you and your ski team can put muscle behind the solution.

Join the XC Climate Challenge (#xcclimatechallenge). Here’s how:

*First, you and your team members will write and sign the Constituent Comment Letter (link and attached).  Please make it positive and solution-oriented.  The goal of these letters is to lead our leaders by showing them that the people in their districts demand strong climate action. Letter comments can be general or, preferably, specific.  We are asking our representatives to join the bipartisan Climate Solutions Caucus, which at this time has 68 members—half Republicans, half Democrats. And also to support CCL’S carbon-fee and dividend proposal.

*Second, send your letters to me, Pete Vordenberg. The Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL) and I will count them and the CCL will hand deliver them to your congressional representatives. These letters are the key element of this project. This strategy has been proven effective!

*Third, nominate youth skiers from your team to take the lead in this effort. Representatives will be selected from all participating teams to represent the cross country community at a Citizen Climate Lobby National Conference in June. Prizes from ski-industry businesses will also be given to teams based on the number of letters they get signed, taking team size into consideration.

That is the challenge.

When: Now. This contest begins now and will end April 30th. Please do not delay! Start now and keep going.

A good team strategy to get as many letters as possible:  

  1.    Create a Climate Activism Event or add Climate Activism to an existing event for your team and community.
  2.    Show the movie “Saving Snow” and have all the constituent comment letters ready to be personalized, signed, put in a large mailing envelope, and sent to me.

How to sign up for a showing of “Saving our Snow”.  Click here.

 

Does your team already have a climate or climate activism project?  Let us know what it is and we can share it with our community!

Contact Pete Vordenberg with questions, ideas and to register your team.

 

pvatuphillskier@gmail.com

Christmas Ski

by: Brad Nelson

 

My mom said not to go out on the ice. “People have been falling through the ice on their snowmobiles and they have been telling people not to go out on the ice,” she said. I didn’t really argue but I didn’t really agree either. Getting out for a ski on their lake is a Christmas tradition for me up there with lefse and pickled herring. The drive to go is strong.

It was cold. And windy. The thermometer read 19 below. I pulled my down coat over my normal ski gear, strapped on my 70s-era Fischer fiberglass touring skis, and took off down the driveway.

I love these skis. It’s somewhat of a Christmas miracle that they still glide and kick ok because the bases are no longer glued to the ski in many spots. The P-Tex undulates like an ocean and is barely hanging on, but one ski adventure at a time I continue to ignore these problems and they continue to perform, loosely speaking. Skiing on them feels like driving a 1972 Olds 98, pure floaty luxury. The kick is always bomber and the glide is always slow, smooth, and stable

The road was surprisingly skiable for those on $5 Goodwill finds. I skied down to the dead end, bush wacked to the peninsula trail, and followed it to the dock used by the people with cabins on the island. Then I slipped out onto the ice.

The lake was cold and windswept. The snow was squeaky and sandpaper slow, but was a good depth for breaking trail. I was dressed warm, the cold wind was just brisk. I found a snowmobile track going my way and settled into a diagonal stride rhythm.

Over the holiday my family fell into conversations about politics, climate change, racism, tax “reform,” net neutrality, the environment, Russian meddling, the future of social security, and many other issues that are incredibly hard to control but huge for our lives. We talked about my cousin in Iowa that refers to progressives like us on Facebook as “libtards” in sentences like, “What are all the libtards going to do about it, we have all the guns?” Luckily, he’s not my only cousin. We talked about how people are falling through the ice because climate change has altered our winters in a short span of time. When I was a kid you could drive a truck on the ice to your icehouse by Christmas and that’s still expected. We talked about how us Americans do so little to stop climate change because Big Oil has a death grip on the system. We held and adored my new niece and nephew. We basked in my daughter’s infectious holiday spirit. We talked about a lot of other things, too, big and small.

But for the moment, I just skied.

Unsolicited Advice for the Youth Skier. P1.

by: Pete Vordenberg

 

For most of my life my goal was to win an Olympic medal.  Along the way I won a few races and even raced in two Olympics.  I didn’t come close to winning a medal but in all my trying I did learn a lot about ski racing and the process of trying to win ski races.  I coached in two Olympics.  And as a coach with the US Ski Team helped take the US from scoring as low as 12 points total in a season to scoring over 2000 a season and winning world cups and world championship medals, which is something that hadn’t been done in over 25 years and which now is almost common place for our team.  Many of my best friends and favorite memories are all from skiing.  I meet my wife skiing.  My college education was earned through skiing, and for most of my life I earned my living through skiing too.  Skiing took me all over the world, from Japan and China to Macedonia, New Zealand, Russia, all over Scandinavia, Europe and North America.  I’d guess that the things I know and believe about life could have been learned doing something else.  But what I know and believe about life I learned through the life of a skier – a great life of outdoor adventure, hard work, camaraderie, some drama and a lot of fun.

You may be a youth skier.  And you may be wondering if this sport is something you should consider pursuing.  Even if this isn’t a consideration for you I believe these thoughts may still be useful to you beyond this or any sport.  Should you be a ski racer, in my reply there are contradictions.  In the same breath I will tell you not to do it for anyone but yourself and also don’t do this just for yourself either.  What I mean is, don’t do this sport because someone else thinks you should, because you show talent, because you want to get a scholarship, or because you love lycra.  Do it because you love doing it.  But also, don’t just do this for yourself.  Competition and sport is at its best a culture of support and of pushing each other to a higher place, a faster pace, to greater things within and beyond sport.  It is a tool of learning and growth, and of teaching and sharing.  Too often sport is a selfish pursuit.  To me that is lonely, sad and a waste of human endeavor.  It can in fact be an Olympic size waste of human endeavor.  But it doesn’t have to be.  To me sport is best when it is used beyond itself to improve the lives of others.

I like what President Obama said when The Cavaliers wore “I can’t Breathe” shirts to the Cav’s – Net’s game:

“You know,” he said, “I think LeBron did the right thing; we forget the role that Muhammad Ali, Arthur Ash, Bill Russell played in raising consciousness.”

Hell yes!  Lets do something more than win ski races and spend all day running around in the woods just for ourselves.

With that, let me share some unsolicited advice to the young skier.

Enjoy the process.  There is way more process, more day-to-day work, than anything else.  If you don’t enjoy that work, those days, then change your mindset, or do something else.  Mindset is vital.  Do not see yourself as good or bad, only as improving, learning, growing.  Be where you are, and work forward from there.  That is the case for both the fastest and the slowest.  Do not postpone enjoyment or satisfaction for those days where you succeed in races or workouts.  There are way more training days to every race, there are way more ok race results to great results.  There is more struggle than triumph.  Do your best, ski your fastest and be satisfied with that.  If you give your best effort be honestly satisfied with that regardless of outcome.  If your skis are bad, ski your fastest on them.  If you don’t feel great, ski your best on that day, how you feel be damned.  If you fall 6 times, get up fast and ski as fast as you can between falls.  Your excuses will fall on deaf ears.  Screw your excuses.  Go to the line with all you can even if you are fighting for a place way below your hopes.  Don’t just ski it in just because you didn’t do as well as you wanted.  That makes you look like a major putz and you don’t get any faster by it.  Skiing it in is an insult to the effort you and your coaches have put into the race.  Judge the race before you know the result.  Me, I say don’t get splits.  Race like you are one second ahead or one second behind all the time.  Don’t wait for the races to be present and focused and don’t wait for your great successes to recognize improvement, or grant yourself enjoyment.  This is a step-by-step process.  Recognize and enjoy the little steps, the little improvements.  Pay great attention to those little steps for this and all paths are made up of little steps.

Next:  Part 2,  Right now is all you will ever have.

Underground

by: Pete Vordenberg

 

 

 

 

 

 

I want to be underground

because nothing trickles down

that you wouldn’t want to wipe up

with a sock that was bound

for the hamper anyway, but I wouldn’t want to write this down

if I didn’t think I had something to say.  Yes,

I want to be underground

because I know anything

worth while

rises up.